Hamilton nurse recognized with DAISY Award - Emily Everett 2013

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

from left, are Shana Kaiser, Gina Hawkins, Joan Addis (Honorable Mention), Emily Everett (recipient), Heather Hartman and Sherry Arp. In the back are Celeste Timms, Shayna McDougle, Chenoa Thomason and Amber Cagle.
Pictured are nurses at Hamilton Medical Center who were nominees for the DAISY Award. In the front, from left, are Shana Kaiser, Gina Hawkins, Joan Addis (Honorable Mention), Emily Everett (recipient), Heather Hartman and Sherry Arp. In the back are Celeste Timms, Shayna McDougle, Chenoa Thomason and Amber Cagle. Not pictured are Brandy Setser, Melanie Owens and Kelli Marcus.

Dalton, Ga. – Emily Everett, a registered nurse at Hamilton Medical Center, recently received the DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses. The DAISY Award recognizes exemplary nursing excellence, and is the highest honor a nurse can receive at Hamilton Medical Center (HMC). An award presentation reception was held in May.

A patient’s family member wanted to recognize Everett for the care she provided and nominated her for the award.

The award, presented in collaboration with The American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) is part of the DAISY Foundation’s program to recognize the super-human efforts nurses perform everyday.

“Emily Everett is an extraordinary nurse,” said Terri Brown, RN, director of Medical Services at HMC. Emily is always very professional and respectful to everyone. She is an excellent nurse and takes great pride in the care she delivers to her patients and their families.  I receive numerous compliments from patients and family members that Emily has taken care of, and I am so glad that the family took the time to fill out a DAISY nomination form for Emily. She is truly deserving of this honor.”

DAISY Award recipients receive an honorary DAISY pin, a banner to display on their unit, an award certificate, and the Healer’s Touch, a hand-carved sculpture by the Shona tribe in Zimbabwe. The sculpture is especially meaningful because of the profound respect the Shona tribe gives to their traditional “healers.” A Shona healer is affectionately regarded as a treasure by those they are caring for which describes exactly how the DAISY Foundation and Hamilton feel about nurses.

Joan Addis, RN, received DAISY Honorable Mention recognition during the reception. Addis works on Hamilton's surgical unit. Other nominees included registered nurses Amber Cagle, Gina Hawkins, Shayna McDougle, Celeste Timms, Sherry Arp, Brandy Setser, Melanie Owens, Shana Kaiser, Chenoa Thomason, Kelli Marcus and Heather Hartman.

“I’d like to ask each of you nurses to pause for a moment and realize that thanks to your education, training, commitment, judgment, compassion and connection with your patients, you are very special,” said Cathy Ferguson, vice president and chief nursing officer, during the presentation. “You make the world a better place by just doing your job.”

The not-for-profit DAISY Foundation is based in Glen Ellen, Calif., and was established by family members in memory of J. Patrick Barnes. Barnes died at the age of 33 in late 1999 from complications of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), a little known but not uncommon auto-immune disease. DAISY is an acronym for Diseases Attacking the Immune System.